DROWNING PREVENTION

Drowning is the second leading cause of unintentional injury-related deaths to children ages 14 and under. A temporary lapse in supervision is a common factor in most drownings and near-drownings. Child drownings can happen in a matter of seconds--in the time it takes to answer the phone. There is often no splashing to warn of trouble. Children can drown in small quantities of water and are at risk in their own homes from wading pools, bathtubs, buckets, diaper pails, and toilets as well as swimming pools, spas, and hot tubs.

  • NEVER leave children unsupervised in or around a body of water - even for a moment. Children can drown in as little as two inches of water in less than one minute.
  • Install a self-closing gate around the pool.
  • Alarm every door leading to water to alert you if a child has gone outside.
  • Teach children water and swimming skills.
  • During pool parties or family beach gatherings, designate an adult to watch the children.
  • Remove any toys that may attract children to the pool area.
  • Install a pool cover to securely cover the water area.
  • Install a poolside, cordless phone.
  • Keep lifesaving equipment - a pole, life preserver and rope - in the pool area.
  • Children with long hair should clip it back or wear a cap in the pool.
  • Avoid keeping water in buckets or other large containers when toddlers are home.
  • Don't rely on flotation devices to protect your children in the water.

 

Drowning Prevention Checklist

  • CONSTANT adult supervision by an adult who knows how to swim
  • Childproof locks on all doors leading to water
  • Gate or fence surrounding water
  • Gate or fence is self-closing with a lock
  • Pool cover is in use
  • Alarms for doors and windows leading to pool are activated
  • Child has completed swim lessons
  • Above-ground pool stairs removed when pool not in use
  • Lifesaving equipment in pool area
  • Pool chemicals and supplies are locked in a secure area
  • Child is watched in bathtub at all times
  • Parent and / or caregiver know CPR